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  def Softwaremaker() :
         return "William Tay", "<Challenging Conventions />"

  knownType_Serialize, about = Softwaremaker()
 

 Tuesday, August 26, 2014

It has been a while folks. To anyone out there still listening, I will be speaking in the Cloud Security Congress 2014 in Singapore touching on "Rethinking the security paradigm in the new world of the Internet-Of-Your-Things".

Topic:
Rethinking the security paradigm in the new world of the Internet-Of-Your-Things
 
Brief synopsis:
With the perfect storm of Cloud Computing, Big Data Analytics and Machine-Learning movements all coming together forming key pillars of Internet-of-Things (IoT), there are good reasons to be worried if we don’t start re-thinking about how we traditionally look at security paradigms. William will discuss briefly on key problematic scenarios that the industry will have to look at if we are to achieve the full promise of what an industry-led IoT can deliver.

Do drop by for a good geek-out and networking session

Tuesday, August 26, 2014 3:41:37 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Sunday, December 29, 2013

    With the official opening of the Marina Coastal Expressway (MCE) today, I have updated the traffic camera list of my SG-Drive Windows Phone application to include the traffic cameras associated with the MCE. I have also remove the older decommissioned cameras that is now in a "defunct" part of the East Coast Parkway (ECP).

    To get the updated camera list - Select and Press the "Reset Traffic Camera Points" on the SG-Drive application. Again, all proceeds of the sales of this application go towards a good charitable cause.

    Sunday, December 29, 2013 9:55:49 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Thursday, July 26, 2012

    It has been more than 18 months but I have finally received my sales proceeds from my WP7 Apps in the Windows Phone Marketplace: SG-Drive and NaviRoutes. It was really projects that I just wanted to get my hands wet into WP7 and XAML programming. It garnered great interest from the start since there was a glut of a WP7 developers. I suspect buying interest had waned since then because there are now tons of developers and also the proliferation of iOS and Android devices out there.

    The sales proceeds I have received from the sale of those applications were only a small token amount. However, as I have said in the T&C in my WP7 applications, sales proceeds of the above will go towards charity. From the very early beginning, I have always given to charities I believe in and, most importantly, often neglected and overlooked. That said, the best mileage is to go for those 1-for-1 charities to get maximum impact per dollar.

    I will update this post once I have decided on a charity to donate the sales proceeds of my WP7 applications to.

    [UPDATE]: Done. Proceeds donated to Children At Risk Empowerment (CARE) Singapore.

    Thanks for all your support.

    Thursday, July 26, 2012 12:58:57 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Sunday, March 04, 2012

    I had posted more than 3 months ago about my little port from WM6.0 to WP7 of my GeoBlog application. This successful port was not made available in the Windows Phone Marketplace as I had stated that there was a need for a back-end Server infrastructure of a web server hosting a simple web service to make this app complete. The push-pin points and locations uploaded will be overlaid on a Google Map, using the Google Maps API, specifically the Javascript SDK. I have no idea at this point in time how to package the back-end Server infrastructure so it is not a complete solution for anyone downloading WP7 GeoBlog without that infrastructure.

    Little did I know that there was quite a bit of interest from emails to me about this application and how I can potentially move that backend infrastructure to the cloud. I had also thought about that. However, it is more complicated than that. For example, it would be easy for those with Azure subscriptions. For those without, it would be another process that not many moms-n-pops can deal with today.

    Anyways, I had no idea this port would have generated that much interest. It seems that while people like the idea of "blogging" their adventure and vacation trails, quite a few of them didnt like the idea of putting it on a public domain due to privacy concerns. My app worked that way because that data collected is private - both on the phone and on the server back-end.

    The surprising interest also came from the fact that mobile broadband (3G, 3.5G) penetration is on the rise, much more than I thought. With telcos setting up bridge domains and more alliances with each other over country boundaries, costs would only go down.

    I am still thinking on how I could package the whole solution before I make it public to the marketplace. To those who have gotten the app and the scripts from me and successfully set up their hosting infrastructure, whether it is at home or at hoster's, Thank you for your support. I am glad that you have enjoyed and benefitted from the application as much as I have.

    Stay tuned for more little enhancements to this WP7 GeoBlog app.

    Saturday, March 03, 2012 10:25:10 PM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Monday, November 07, 2011

    After so many months of starts, stops and many distractions, I finally took the time over the (long) weekend to port my Windows Mobile 6.0 GeoBlog application over to Windows Phone 7. I had searched and waited so long for a similar application on the Windows Phone Marketplace but none were there that could do what I wanted it to do.

    While geo-taggers, geo-markers can be found in the dozens in the Windows Phone Marketplace, most of them doesnt allow you to share with your family and loved ones on the trails you have been to, local or somewhere exotic and far-away. Even the ones piggy-bagging on Google Maps doesnt have certain features like adding comments, taking pictures with each geo-blogging location.

    Hence, I decided to port my Windows Mobile application to Windows Phone 7, taking this opportunity to add and further enhance some of the features along the way. I named this application WP7 GeoBlog and I will be taking this along to the Great Ocean Road a few weeks later.

    However, I am not publishing on the Windows Phone Marketplace as of yet. Reason is because, it needs a certain back-end Server infrastructure of a web server hosting a simple web service. The push-pin points and locations uploaded will be overlaid on a Google Map, using the Google Maps API, specifically the Javascript SDK. I have no idea at this point in time how to package the back-end Server infrastructure so it is not a complete solution for anyone downloading WP7 GeoBlog without that infrastructure.

    If you have a developer-unlocked or jail-broken WP7 and want to try this out, feel free to drop me a note here. For now, I will leave my readers here with an image that my WM 6.0 GeoBlog application generated when I was in Hokkaido, Japan last year.

     

    Monday, November 07, 2011 12:05:56 PM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Saturday, September 24, 2011

    This might be a little bit different from what this blog is themed towards but it still has a slight tinge of software flavour to it.

    Those that know me well will know that I have been dabbling in music for the past year or so. The sound engineering aspects of it, besides the musical genre, fascinates me with all regards to acoustic and digital. I recently had a chance to learn about the lip-sync issues that HDMI threw up. The write-up here is very good and explains why HDMI 1.2, 1.3 are are all poor bandaids on a problem that shouldn't have happened in the first place. RTP packets (in internet VOIP and video) have timestamps and packets that link those to a shared timebase so you can synchronize audio and video. It is therefore strange and unimaginable to me, from an engineering perspective, that the first version of HDMI was released without at least considering the possible variable delays on the two chains. OK, I have digressed.

    In any case, I had the chance to encounter this problem straight-up recently when I wire-up all the video devices I had with HDMI because of the many HDMI options my new TV offered me. However, the audio capabilities of my AV receiver remained, at best, at an analog level.

    In a nutshell, what happened, was that the the audio delivered through my AV receiver->speakers was processed, and therefore heard, lot faster than what the visuals was processed to the TV. In other words, I heard the crash ahead of the specific moment when the drummer actually crashed on the cymbals.

    Contrary to popular belief, this is NOT a lip-sync issue that HDMI 1.3 was designed to solve. The usual culprit in audio lag is due to a TV's video processing, which is constantly trying to send a resolution that matches your TV's native resolution. Most of the workaounds today revolve around getting an AV receiver that allow a time-lag adjustment that enables you to set audio delay by source, in effect, allowing you to calibrate, or slow down, your audio processing to match the *slower* video processing. This works, provided you have enough dough to cough out to get a new AV receiver, with matching speakers probably.

    I decided to apply some common sense and see if there is a way to *speed-up* my video processing so it can catch up with the audio processing instead. Now, I am aware that this would probably mean that you may not get the best visuals for your TV. However, to be honest, a lot of the infinite details is not visible to the naked eye, not mine anyways, so I am willing to live with that compromise.

    If you are still with me at this point, you would understand that most TVs today come with a "Game-mode". It is designed to reduce the amount of processing involved in producing the image on the screen so that high-speed high-intensity graphical images can be served up fast on your TV. By speeding up the served image, it reduces input lag.

    I set my TV to "Game-mode" and true enough, the *calibration effect* was applied and now my video processing could now match my audio processing. The graphics are still superb as visible to my naked eye, just less vivid, which is not something you would care about while watching a live concert DVD, etc.

    Till I decide to plonk down money to get an AV receiver that allows me to set a time-lag/delay for my audio-processing, this *free* workaround actually works well and will suffice for now.

    Saturday, September 24, 2011 3:11:27 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Tuesday, August 16, 2011

    Time to do my sporadic updates on this blog again. I have been making quite a few presentations on Business Intelligence recently and my next presentation will be together with Panoroma on the 17th August 2011 in Microsoft Singapore. Title of the presentation will be "Generate Actionable Insights and Increase Efficiency with Intuitive Business Intelligence"

    Necto BI

    With my usual presentation style of decorating the business of analytics with an interactive storyboard, I will be dotting the presentation with some bits on SQL Server "Denali" as well, highlighting on Project Cresent and PowerPivot v2. It should be a fun event. Come on down if you are around.

    Monday, August 15, 2011 11:53:58 PM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Saturday, June 25, 2011

    For those old WP7 faithfuls who are trying to get WP7 update 7.0.7392.0 to work on their Omnia7 without any success and thinking you have bricked your phone, I have managed to get mine to work successfully.

    It is not an exercise for the faint-hearted and requires good 3-finger coordination. It is somehow still linked to an underlying bootloader issue from Samsung for the Omnia7. Read and download the fixed USB driver for Omnia7 here: http://bit.ly/mN3tzu and http://bit.ly/jUEnBJ. Make sure your Omnia7 bootloader is more than 4.10.1.9. http://bit.ly/jVxK8B. Mine is the 4.11.0.4 and it worked like a charm. This really reminds me of those great CE and WM days :)

    Saturday, June 25, 2011 10:05:17 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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