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  def Softwaremaker() :
         return "William Tay", "<Challenging Conventions />"

  knownType_Serialize, about = Softwaremaker()
 

 Thursday, December 03, 2009

Sigh. I try to avoid commenting or referencing public marketing furor over Microsoft because I am just not a cult-fanatic or hold a religious view on technology (for Goodness sake - Get a life ...) BUT the story that PervX ran that says: "Black Screen woes could affect millions on Windows 7, Vista and XP" is really saying something about the responsibility issues that comes with technology journalism.

Gosh - really, is there nothing we can do about this ?

Obviously, PervX was made to eat their own words. They issued a public apology to Microsoft but there is obviously still a sense of denial in between the lines.

Ed Bott says it best here and how I wished this furor they caused stays with them for a long time until redemption time comes. As what Ed says in his closing para: "As for Prevx, they deserve to be laughed out of the security commmunity for their role in this fiasco."

 

Thursday, December 03, 2009 7:12:25 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Thursday, November 12, 2009

    Q: There is a Windows Workflow Foundation (WF) workflow service which contains only one pair of Receive and SendReply. Data will be sent through the Receive activity and how do I get the workflow service to return the GUID of the workflow instance in SendReply activity.

    A: Write a custom activity to retrieve it (See below). Bind that to a variable and bind that variable to the SendReply.Content

        public sealed class GetWorkflowInstanceId : CodeActivity<Guid>
        {
            protected override Guid Execute(CodeActivityContext context)
            {
                return context.WorkflowInstanceId;
            }
        }

    Thursday, November 12, 2009 10:07:56 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Tuesday, November 03, 2009

    Q: Does BizTalk Server WCF Custom Adapters support Identity Federation ?

    A: Yes, it does. The WCF adapter supports the ws2007FederationHttpBinding. BizTalk MVP Yossi Dahan blogs about it extensively here.

    Tuesday, November 03, 2009 10:10:17 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Saturday, October 24, 2009

    For years, I have expanded my brains to learn on different skills and topics as I have always believed in the principle of constant learning and experimenting. The day where you stop learning is the day you decay. I love nothing more than to keep my brains (and sometimes limbs) stimulated and to me, sometimes, sleep is a waste of precious time ...

    So, I have received some emails asking me why the silence on this blog and what is ticking my fancy these days since some people have caught sight of this post and wondering if those books have gone to waste. Well, NO as I believe that for every thing you learn today does contribute to a certain extent of context what you learn and how you absorb new skills tomorrow.

    In a nutshell, I have many books, Some bought, some based on the fact that I was a technical reviewer for a certain publisher and I get getting new titles in my mail.

    While, I have many titles on my bookshelves. Here is a list of my important bibles throughout the years. It gives a sense of what I did, what I am doing now but in no way tells you what I will be doing next (although I have a brief idea on some shiny stuff that will keep me stimulated next ).

    1993:

    • Liskin's dBASE IV 1.1 Programming Book
    • dBase IV Programming

    1995/98:

    • Beyond Candlesticks
    • The Battle for Investment Survival
    • The Art of Speculation
    • Reminiscences of a Stock Operator

    1998/99:

    • Subclassing and Hooking with Visual Basic
    • Pure Visual Basic
    • Visual Basic 6
    • Visual Basic Complete
    • Visual Basic Developers Guide to the Win32 API

    2001/02:

    • Advanced .NET Programming
    • Professional VB.NET Programming
    • .NET Framework Essentials
    • HTML Complete

    2003/05:

    • Enterprise Integration Patterns
    • Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture
    • Design Patterns
    • Programming .NET Components
    • COM and .NET component Services
    • Enterprise Services with the .NET Framework

    2006/08:

    • The Ruby Programming Language
    • Hadoop
    • Masterminds of Programming
    • The Art of Concurrency
    • Simply Rails 2
    • Programming SQL Server 2008
    • BizTalk 2006 Recipes
    • Professional BizTalk 2006

    2009 (today):

    • Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer: Jim Chapin
    • Stick Control for the Snare Drummer: George Lawrence Stone
    • The Drummer's Complete Vocabulary: Alan Dawson / Jack Ramsay
    • Progressive Steps to Syncopation for the Modern Drummer: Ted Reed

    While it may seemed that I focused on different things, I do have a list of milestones and objectives set for each learning phrase in my life that I target to achieve before I move on to the next. This will ensure that I really learn deep and not just skim. Yes, I can still code up a decent XML Schema XSD by-hand but I dont think I will get any applause for that .

    I do have another blog dedicated to my current interest in music but I will just leave it for the interested and inquisitive minds to find it. So, I hope to perform one day for some of you at Jazz At Southbridge or even more ambitious someplace in New York. I am sure, for this, I will get some slight applause.

    Ahhhh - one is allowed to dream or fantasize, arent we ?

    Saturday, October 24, 2009 3:42:47 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Friday, September 04, 2009

    I read with amazement at how Google is allowed and could be bestowed a patent for their iconic search home page.

    No, dont get me wrong, this is not about Google and I always give credit where it is due BUT gosh - I am very sure that way before Google, there were a few that came up with this UI design. I believe I saw Yahoo! Search page way before Google. While it may not be the same, I am quite sure the design principles are the same.

    In my years of IT project developments and deployments, I am sure I have seen many of my teams' designer engineers come up with the same principles into database full-text search, Index servers, etc

    In any case, this is interesting and this does change the patent strategy for many companies, doesn't it ? I wonder if Bing would do the same for its background images. Furthermore, to enable users to allow that to be turned on or off is itself a "patent-able* design, wouldn' it be ?

    Friday, September 04, 2009 12:40:14 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Wednesday, August 26, 2009

    I cannot remember where I got the below information from BUT I am posting it here as a note to self just-in-case I became so good (which will never happen) and I get endorsed by Bosphorus Cymbals.


    The process by which two branches of the Zildjian family ended up in a heated transcontinental competition for roughly 40 years is complicated. But for fans of classic hard bop and acoustic jazz, nothing suffices like the vintage, hand-hammered K. Zildjian cymbals jazz icons and Gretsch endorsees such as Elvin Jones, Tony Williams, Mel Lewis, Art Blakey, Philly Joe Jones and Art Taylor used to employ back in the '50s and '60s when this American company was located in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, and imported K. cymbals from Turkey to package with its drum sets.

    In 1968 the Avedis Zildjian & Company finally purchased K. Zildjian and granted Baldwin (then-owners of Gretsch) exclusive USA distribution rights for 10 years in exchange for all trademarks thereof. Zildjian continued to import K. cymbals from Istanbul until 1975, when difficulties in dealing with the Turkish government caused them to relocate the principles of the old K. Zildjian factory (Avedis' cousins Mikhail and Kerope Zilcan and their sons) to its Canadian factory in Meductic, New Brunswick. After the death of patriarch Avedis Zildjian in 1979, his sons Robert and Armand split up the business, so that the former carries on the venerable hand-hammering tradition of cymbal-making in Canada, under the trademark of Sabian (in its HH line), while the latter employs computer-assisted technology to produce a modern K. Zildjian line and a more traditionally configured K. Constantinople line under the aegis of Avedis Zildjian & Co. in Norwell, Mass.

    So what ever happened to the old K. factory back in Turkey and all those skilled artisans who remained behind? Therein lies another ridiculously Byzantine tale, wherein artisans Oksun and Agop Tumacurk (who learned the art of making cast cymbals from Mikhail and Kerope Zilcan) begat what became Istanbul Cymbals out of the old factory, which in turn begat both a Mehmet & Agop branch of Istanbul, as well as a Turkish Cymbals offshoot, and finally-since 1996-Bosphorus Cymbals, whose master craftsmen Hasan Seker, Hasan Ozdemir and Ibrahim Yakici apprenticed as children under the Tumacurk brothers. Whew!

    Splitting hairs as to how much actual handwork is involved (as opposed to the use of machines to replace certain labor-intensive aspects of the cymbal-making process) will have little meaning for the average drummer. But Bosphorus' intricate style of overhammering these cast cymbals on both the top and bottom imparts a unique temper and relaxation to the metal for a warm, vowel-like attack, with a relatively deep pitch and a rich, complex wash of controlled overtones.

    What makes cymbals from the Bosphorus Masters and Traditional series singular is their peppery tonality and soft-focus balance of attack, decay and overtones. I auditioned a 20-inch Masters ride that was so thin you could easily flex the edges, which had a perceptible wobble when played with a stick and a remarkably low pitch-which translated into a light, dry, airy stick sound redolent of a flat ride, as the small bell was too delicate to elicit much in the way of cowbell-type accents. However, a beautiful 20-inch traditional Medium ride that I sampled offered a brawnier attack and more articulated bell sound without compromising the full-bodied pitch and delicate harmonic characteristics so prized by acoustic jazz drummers, while Bosphorus' 20-inch Masters Flat was simply magnificent with its buttery, giving feel, creamy tonal balance and taut, well-centered attack-a supple, understated groove machine.

    The sense of Bosphorus as a bastion of delicate, acoustic specialty instruments was quickly disabused by a random sampling from its Antique line of cymbals, in which the cymbal is fully lathed on the back, with a raw, unlathed bell and an unlathed strip in the middle third of the cymbal bow. This resulted in gating the cymbal, which is not so effective an effect on its smaller crash and splash cymbals (which were too choked and dry for my tastes), but damn near perfect on its 20-inch medium-thin Antique Original ride-with a warm controlled wash of overtones that opened up ever so slightly before rolling back into tight, sweetly articulated sticking patterns with an excellent bell sound. Adding rivets in the form of a 20-inch Antique Sizzle ride made for a light, bouncy ride with a nicely controlled wash, while its 20-inch Medium and 22-inch Antique Flat offered dark, penetrating, ride sound with bell-like characteristics in a much heavier configuration, while its 14-inch hats offered a dark chip sound with a well-contained stick response.

    Bosphorus Antique cymbals offer modern drummers an authentic taste of ancient Turkey in a more meaty, modern configuration-for those players who want to up the ante volume and projection in both jazz-fusion and rock applications.

    Wednesday, August 26, 2009 3:05:51 PM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Tuesday, May 05, 2009
    Tuesday, May 05, 2009 2:16:00 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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  •  Monday, May 04, 2009

    Both references are good reads and would propbably be a good debate topic for many but lets not do the religious cult thing:

    Abstraction, Componentization, Reusability, etc. They have all changed the world the developers live and breathe in, havent they ? No, I dont want to sauter transistors on a motherboard anymore. Give me a PC anytime. Give me solutions.

    My personal opinion is that there is no end and you cannot find a answer that fits all. Question one has to ask is:

    • Are you looking for a brick builder/manufacturer
    • ... Or are you just interested in building a wall/house ?

    Make no mistake, I think there is a market for both. However, chances are, no one single good person will fit both bills. 

    Monday, May 04, 2009 3:40:46 AM (Malay Peninsula Standard Time, UTC+08:00)  #    Disclaimer 
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